Blossoms makes the News

After a busy few weeks, it was great to see that Blossoms made it into the Leicester Mercury. For those parents that have not seen our latest update to the nursery, you will have to come and visit us or take a look at the Gallery page. Here is the link to the article about us. Blossoms in the...

Tackling Teething Troubles

When will your baby’s first pearly white start to poke through? Most babies get their first tooth at around 6 months, but your child’s chompers may appear as early as 3 months or as late as 14, depending on such factors as when Mom and Dad started sprouting teeth and whether or not your baby was a preemie (preemies tend to teethe on the late side). How babies experience teething can vary widely, too. Some have symptoms – such as excessive drooling and crankiness – weeks before a tooth actually emerges, while others show no signs at all. Baby-tooth timeline Typically, babies get their teeth in pairs. First come the middle two on the bottom. A month or so later, the two above those arrive. Still, it’s not uncommon to see a baby with four bottom and no upper teeth, or the reverse. A general timeline: 6 months: lower central incisors 8 months: upper central incisors 10 months: lower and upper lateral incisors 14 months: first molars 18 months: canines 24 months: second molars Signs of teething Short of actually seeing a tooth poking through, and given that the process is different for every baby, some possible symptoms to watch for: The need to gnaw. The pressure of an emerging tooth beneath the gums may be relieved by counterpressure, so teething babies often want to chomp on things. The chewing instinct may also be a response to the odd sensation that something’s going on in there. Puffy gums: Before a new tooth erupts, it can cause a red, swollen, bruised-looking area on a baby’s gums. Sometimes the gum bulges...

Mom’s First Aid tips

It’s a well-known fact that moms have a magic touch with boo-boos. But you can heighten your powers when caring for cuts and scrapes so they heal quickly: Clean the area with water (whatever temperature’s comfortable for your child) to get rid of any debris. Then flush the wound with running water for at least 90 seconds — not the 10 to 15 seconds most of us do  — to wash away bacteria. It’s the pressure that’s most important for zapping germs, but if there’s no tap, use baby wipes or bottled water until you can get to a bathroom. Wash gently with soap and water or, in a pinch, dishwashing liquid or baby-friendly liquid soaps. If you have antibacterial cleanser, use it (not a good idea for everyday use — bacteria can develop resistance over time  — but great now, when you really want to kill germs). Pat it dry with a clean cloth or paper towel. If the wound’s still bleeding, apply pressure to the area for five minutes. You’ll be tempted, but don’t peek! Releasing it before the blood has had time to clot may make the cut bleed faster. If it’s still bleeding, reapply pressure for another five minutes. (If the blood flow hasn’t slowed after ten minutes, get medical help.) Don’t disinfect with rubbing alcohol, hydrogen peroxide, or iodine. All three can sting or burn, and they’re just not needed. Plus, alcohol dries the skin (which can slow healing) and hydrogen peroxide inhibits the growth of healthy cells. Soap and water are enough. Apply an antibiotic cream. Put it on as soon as the...

Seperation Anxiety Age By Age

By Suzanne Schlosberg, Parenting Until they were 11 months old, my twin boys were so nonchalant whenever I’d leave the room that they seemed like a couple of teenagers. As I’d head off to work, the boys would glance my way, then resume chewing on their barnyard animals or playing with their babysitter. They seemed to be thinking, “Eh, catch you later, Mom — whatever.” I figured: Phew! We dodged all the separation-anxiety drama that had stressed out so many of my friends. (Hey, maybe we’d get lucky and bypass the terrible twos, too!) But then one morning, reality struck big-time. As I opened the door to leave, Ian, the small, scrappy one, began rolling around the floor, wailing as if stricken by food poisoning. Toby, his chubby, gentle brother, clung to my leg, bawling so hard he could barely breathe. I was heartbroken, and totally flummoxed. I had no clue why it was happening or what approach would be easiest on the boys. “Separation anxiety can happen almost overnight, which makes it shocking to parents,” says Sara Abbot, associate director of the Family Resource Counseling Center in Los Angeles. What’s more, it’s often not just a one-time, babyhood phase for many kids. The tears and fears related to being apart from Mom or Dad can resurface in the toddler and preschool years, posing new challenges for parents and warranting different solutions. As disheartening as that may sound, it can be very helpful to remember that separation anxiety is completely normal, even healthy. “From the earliest years of life, we should want children to encounter ordinary adversity because it’s...

Some Common Toddler Tantrums & Ways to Cope

Ordinarily, the great thing about having a toddler is watching them develop their own sense of self. That, however, includes the discovery that they have a fully functioning mind and a will of their own. And as they say, where there’s a ‘will’, there’s also a ‘won’t’! The good news: Resistance is not only normal, it’s healthy (it’s your child gaining confidence, learning independence, and figuring out who they are as a person in their own right). The better news: There are tricks for guiding them into a more co-operative attitude and mind-set. Hurray!!! Here are five of the most frustrating but common toddler tussles you’re likely to face: “My toddler won’t let me strap him/her into the car seat.” Worth a battle? Absolutely. Car seats aren’t just the law, it’s a matter of life or death. Keep your toddler in a five-point-harness seat as long as possible. They’re safer, and harder to unfasten mid-journey. Tactics to try: Keep it light. Make a game out of things that need to be done. You can make it a race to see who can get buckled into their car seat first if you have more than one child in the car, or timing it aloud by counting to ten can keep the pace up if you just have one child with you. Distracting play, like silly songs or goofy faces, works, too. Bribe them…… pure and simple. If there is limited time (and that often proves the case for me!) You can try a simple bribe to encourage co-operation. A bag of sweet treats that you give one of if they...

How To Raise A Bookworm

Tips to apply from babyhood upwards Babies and books are a great mix! Understandably your child may not be able to leaf through their book on their own just yet – or even pat the pictures without drooling on them a little – but the fact remains that an infant gets a lot out of story time. Just by holding up a simple picture book for your baby to see as they sit on your lap, you’re demonstrating what books are for and how you use them – eg. that you read from left to right and top to bottom, and turn the pages etc. All essential parts of understanding for later ‘actual’ reading. Listening to your reading voice helps your baby become familiar with the flow and basic rules of language. In fact, experts say that children who are read to regularly have an easier time learning to read later on.   Try to read together for at least a few minutes every day so your baby comes to expect and look forward to story time as they grow. Books with big illustrations are easy on little eyes, and touch-and-feel books are always nice interactive fun, too. Help your child run their hands over the textures if they can’t manage to do it by themselves. Most importantly, don’t be discouraged if your little one is more interested in chewing on the pages than touching them. Part of the way babies learn about objects is by putting them in their mouths.   The main aim is really to communicate that reading is a satisfying and rewarding experience. If you...

Developing a Sleep Routine

By Tamara Jeffries, Parenting For the first months after we brought our new daughter home from the hospital, I was thankful to see the sun come up each morning – in part because that’s the only way I knew day from night. Like most new moms, I was struggling to adapt to Infant Standard Time, in which 3 a.m. was a perfectly normal hour for our entire household to be awake. Mali’s nap schedule looked something like this: Day 1 – 11:30 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. Day 2 – 10:30 a.m. to 10:37 a.m.; 1:17 p.m. to 1:23 p.m.; 5:15 p.m. to 7:48 p.m. Day 3 – No nap. Fussing and fretting instead. I’d spend each day asking myself, Is it time for her to nurse again? When did I last change her diaper? I was exhausted, confused, and constantly faced with my poor mothering skills. You have to get her on a schedule, well-meaning parents suggested – even those who naturally tended to go with the flow. Routine is good for children, the books said. It did make sense that some order would be as soothing for me as it would be for my baby. After all, imagine what it must be like for infants. Every day brings new experiences: blades of grass, ringing phones, a bird – all major phenomena if you’ve never experienced them before. With all that novelty flooding a developing brain, it’s logical that some sameness (a reliable naptime, a regular bath ritual) would be comforting. I wanted that security for Mali. But I couldn’t get organized enough to take a shower. How would...

Welcome To Our New Website

  Our first post is a short one, wishing a warm welcome to all of the visitors to our new site. We would like to let current parents know that there are new photos on the ‘gallery’ page of our recent sports day, and we have also put our June newsletter onto the ‘newsletters’ page. We have protected both of these pages for security reasons, and you can ask us at the office for the password. We will also be putting up regular news items, as well as pointers and activities that you can carry out at home with your...